F.A.Q


What is a Security Survey?

A Security Survey is a thorough physical examination at a given point in time of a facility and its operations with respect to personnel and company assets.

It examines the risks these assets are exposed to, and reviews the measures that are in place to protect them and to mitigate liability. It identifies vulnerabilities and makes recommendations on how these can be improved.

This can be relevant for new locations or existing facilities, particularly after a loss or incident has occurred.

The objective of the survey is to produce a report based upon factual information, recommendations that allow the client to make sound financial decisions based on a cost benefit basis and (ROI) return on investment.

What is a Security Audit?

A Security Audit is different in as much that the survey is a process to assess whether an existing security system and procedures are operating to set of standards or criteria they were designed to. It evaluates the administration of the system, security awareness of employees, the management controls and compliance with standards. This is a valuable tool to give an accurate overview to the senior management.
The objective of the survey is to produce a report based upon factual information to demonstrate compliance with the current security posture of the premises.

What is a Qualitative Security Survey?

A qualitative analysis is more suitable when evaluating lower security applications. These facilities will have lower consequence loss assets and so will be better able to withstand loss or damage of an asset.
Some examples might include retail stores, apartment buildings, small businesses, and restaurants.

What is a Quantitative Security Survey ?

A rigorous quantitative analysis is required for protection of assets with unacceptably high consequence of loss, even if the probability of an adversary attack is low. This is a characteristic of high security systems typically found at pharmaceutical facilities, nuclear power plants, prisons, government and military installations, plus some museums, refineries, utilities, airports, telecommunications hubs and large industrial complexes. In each of these cases the loss of or damage to at least some of these assets can have high consequences.